Sales: 833-641-1814 - Service: 585-582-1600
      Scam of the Week: Massive DocuSign Phishing Attacks  DocuSign has admitted they were the victim of a data breach that has led to massive phishing attacks which used exfiltrated DocuSign information. Ouch. So here is your Scam of the Week.  They discovered the data breach when on May 9, 15, and 17 DocuSign, customers were being targeted with phishing campaigns. They now are advising customers to filter or delete any emails with specific subject lines. We do not repeat them here, because this newsletter might be filtered out, but you can see them at the blog, together with screenshots:  https://blog.knowbe4.com/scam-of-the-week-docusign-phishing-attacks   The campaigns all have Word docs as attachments, and use social engineering to trick users into activating Word's macro feature which will download and install malware on the user's workstation. DocuSign warned that it is highly likely there will be more campaigns in the future.  I suggest you send the following to your employees. You're welcome to copy, paste, and/or edit:  "Hackers have stolen the customer email database of DocuSign, the company that allows companies to electronically sign documents. These criminals are now sending phishing emails that look exactly like the real DocuSign ones, but they try to trick you into opening an attached Word file and click to enable editing.  But if you do that, malware may be installed on your workstation. So if you get emails that look like they come from DocuSign and have an attachment, be very careful. If there is any doubt, pick up the phone and verify before you electronically sign any DocuSign email. Remember: Think Before You Click."  Safe Regards, Dan

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Scam of the Week: Massive DocuSign Phishing Attacks

DocuSign has admitted they were the victim of a data breach that has led to massive phishing attacks which used exfiltrated DocuSign information. Ouch. So here is your Scam of the Week.

They discovered the data breach when on May 9, 15, and 17 DocuSign, customers were being targeted with phishing campaigns. They now are advising customers to filter or delete any emails with specific subject lines. We do not repeat them here, because this newsletter might be filtered out, but you can see them at the blog, together with screenshots:
https://blog.knowbe4.com/scam-of-the-week-docusign-phishing-attacks

The campaigns all have Word docs as attachments, and use social engineering to trick users into activating Word's macro feature which will download and install malware on the user's workstation. DocuSign warned that it is highly likely there will be more campaigns in the future.

I suggest you send the following to your employees. You're welcome to copy, paste, and/or edit:

"Hackers have stolen the customer email database of DocuSign, the company that allows companies to electronically sign documents. These criminals are now sending phishing emails that look exactly like the real DocuSign ones, but they try to trick you into opening an attached Word file and click to enable editing.

But if you do that, malware may be installed on your workstation. So if you get emails that look like they come from DocuSign and have an attachment, be very careful. If there is any doubt, pick up the phone and verify before you electronically sign any DocuSign email. Remember: Think Before You Click."

Safe Regards,
Dan

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      Latest Wannacry Ransomware Information  Hi Folks,  Just watched  https://www.sans.org/webcasts/latest-wannacry-ransomware-105150 .  If you’ve not been keeping up with the Wannacry ransomware, it’s probably worth an hour to view it.  The insight on how people were tracking it down and reacting to it could be useful.  I’d give it a 4/5 on topic/interest/content depending on how much you’ve already learned about wannacry.  Safe Regards, Dan

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Latest Wannacry Ransomware Information

Hi Folks,

Just watched https://www.sans.org/webcasts/latest-wannacry-ransomware-105150.

If you’ve not been keeping up with the Wannacry ransomware, it’s probably worth an hour to view it.  The insight on how people were tracking it down and reacting to it could be useful.

I’d give it a 4/5 on topic/interest/content depending on how much you’ve already learned about wannacry.

Safe Regards,
Dan

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      [URGENT ALERT] Defend Against This Ransomware WMD NOW   This is not a drill, or a phishing test.   Yet unknown cyber criminals have taken an NSA 0-day threat and weaponized a ransomware strain so that it replicates like a worm and takes over the whole network.    This is the biggest ransomware outbreak in history.  There is a MS patch that needs to be applied urgently if you have not done that already.   I suggest you immediately look into this and patch your systems before your users come back to work on Monday. Here is a blog post with all the updated detail:   https://blog.knowbe4.com/ransomware-attack-uses-nsa-0-day-exploits-to-go-on-worldwide-rampage   Yes, if you hover, this link is redirected, but you can cut&paste the link to our blog if you are paranoid. (which you should be!)  This is a bad one. Let's stay safe out there.   Safe Regards,  Dan

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[URGENT ALERT] Defend Against This Ransomware WMD NOW

This is not a drill, or a phishing test.

Yet unknown cyber criminals have taken an NSA 0-day threat and weaponized a ransomware strain so that it replicates like a worm and takes over the whole network. 

This is the biggest ransomware outbreak in history. There is a MS patch that needs to be applied urgently if you have not done that already. 

I suggest you immediately look into this and patch your systems before your users come back to work on Monday. Here is a blog post with all the updated detail:

https://blog.knowbe4.com/ransomware-attack-uses-nsa-0-day-exploits-to-go-on-worldwide-rampage

Yes, if you hover, this link is redirected, but you can cut&paste the link to our blog if you are paranoid. (which you should be!)

This is a bad one. Let's stay safe out there. 

Safe Regards,

Dan

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      New York is the first State to enforce regulation laws towards Financial companies specific to Cyber Security.  The regulation makes it clear that cybersecurity is not solely a technology or information security team matter. It comprises an enterprise-level approach to managing cyber risk by expressly imposing responsibility for the cybersecurity program on senior management and requiring not only technical controls, but operational controls, policies and procedures, training programs and reporting to senior management and the board.  Many pieces of this regulations are expected to be adopted by the end of this summer.  Here is a great article on this topic.   http://ahearnelaw.com/revised-newyork-cybersecurity-rules-for-financial-companies-start-march-1-2017/   From NYS DFS:  http://www.dfs.ny.gov/legal/regulations/adoptions/dfsrf500txt.pdf   Also check with your associations to see if they have developed templates for your industry for policies and procedures.  As part of our managed services we help in the development of proper policies and procedures. This is the first step in compliance. However, few organizations have proper ones in place. Our years of experience in HIPAA and PCI-DSS make this a no-brainer. It is like running a business without a business plan, bad things can happen.  Safe Regards,| Dan  P.S. – You may find (and request) useful information here on our site:  https://www.skyport-it.com/useful-materials-just-for-you

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New York is the first State to enforce regulation laws towards Financial companies specific to Cyber Security.  The regulation makes it clear that cybersecurity is not solely a technology or information security team matter. It comprises an enterprise-level approach to managing cyber risk by expressly imposing responsibility for the cybersecurity program on senior management and requiring not only technical controls, but operational controls, policies and procedures, training programs and reporting to senior management and the board.

Many pieces of this regulations are expected to be adopted by the end of this summer.

Here is a great article on this topic.

http://ahearnelaw.com/revised-newyork-cybersecurity-rules-for-financial-companies-start-march-1-2017/

From NYS DFS: http://www.dfs.ny.gov/legal/regulations/adoptions/dfsrf500txt.pdf

Also check with your associations to see if they have developed templates for your industry for policies and procedures.

As part of our managed services we help in the development of proper policies and procedures. This is the first step in compliance. However, few organizations have proper ones in place. Our years of experience in HIPAA and PCI-DSS make this a no-brainer. It is like running a business without a business plan, bad things can happen.

Safe Regards,|
Dan

P.S. – You may find (and request) useful information here on our site: https://www.skyport-it.com/useful-materials-just-for-you

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      Hey: Don’t Click That Weird Google Docs Link You Just Got (and Tell Your Mom Not to Click, Either)  A very convincing Google Docs phishing scheme is racing around the internet right now, which means you should avoid clicking any weird Google Docs that have been emailed to you recently — even if it’s from someone you know. It’s spreading incredibly quickly:  Safe Regards, Dan

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Hey: Don’t Click That Weird Google Docs Link You Just Got (and Tell Your Mom Not to Click, Either)

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      VMware Releases Security Advisories for Various Critical Vulnerabilities in vCenter, Workstation, and more  Description: VMware has releases two security advisories addressing eight vulnerabilities across vCenter Server, Unified Access Gateway, Horizon View, and Workstation. The first advisory details CVE-2017-5641, a remote code execution flaw in vCenter Server manifesting via BlazeDS. The second advisory addresses a vulnerability in Unified Access Gateway and Horizon View that could allow an attacker to execute code on the security gateway. The second advisory also addresses various flaws in Cortado ThinPrint that could allow a guest to execute code or perform a denial of service attack on the host operating system. VMware has released software updates that address these vulnerabilities. Reference: -  http://www.vmware.com/security/advisories/VMSA-2017-0007.html  -  http://www.vmware.com/security/advisories/VMSA-2017-0008.html  Snort SID: Detection pending release of vulnerability information

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VMware Releases Security Advisories for Various Critical Vulnerabilities in vCenter, Workstation, and more

VMware has releases two security advisories addressing eight vulnerabilities across vCenter Server, Unified Access Gateway, Horizon View, and Workstation.

Comment

      Overlooking risks leads to breach, $400,000 settlement  The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office for Civil Rights (OCR), has announced a Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) settlement based on the lack of a security management process to safeguard electronic protected health information (ePHI). Metro Community Provider Network (MCPN), a federally-qualified health center (FQHC), has agreed to settle potential noncompliance with the HIPAA Privacy and Security Rules by paying $400,000 and implementing a corrective action plan. With this settlement amount, OCR considered MCPN’s status as a FQHC when balancing the significance of the violation with MCPN’s ability to maintain sufficient financial standing to ensure the provision of ongoing patient care. MCPN provides primary medical care, dental care, pharmacies, social work, and behavioral health care services throughout the greater Denver, Colorado metropolitan area to approximately 43,000 patients per year, a large majority of whom have incomes at or below the poverty level.  On January 27, 2012, MCPN filed a breach report with OCR indicating that a hacker accessed employees' email accounts and obtained 3,200 individuals' ePHI through a phishing incident. OCR’s investigation revealed that MCPN took necessary corrective action related to the phishing incident; however, the investigation also revealed that MCPN failed to conduct a risk analysis until mid-February 2012. Prior to the breach incident, MCPN had not conducted a risk analysis to assess the risks and vulnerabilities in its ePHI environment, and, consequently, had not implemented any corresponding risk management plans to address the risks and vulnerabilities identified in a risk analysis. When MCPN finally conducted a risk analysis, that risk analysis, as well as all subsequent risk analyses, were insufficient to meet the requirements of the Security Rule.  “Patients seeking health care trust that their providers will safeguard and protect their health information,” said OCR Director Roger Severino. “Compliance with the HIPAA Security Rule helps covered entities meet this important obligation to their patient communities.”  The Resolution Agreement and Corrective Action Plan may be found on the OCR website at  http://www.hhs.gov/hipaa/for-professionals/compliance-enforcement/agreements/MCPN   OCR’s guidance on the Security Rule may be found at  https://www.hhs.gov/hipaa/for-professionals/security/guidance/index.html   To learn more about non-discrimination and health information privacy laws, your civil rights, and privacy rights in health care and human service settings, and to find information on filing a complaint, visit us at  http://www.hhs.gov/hipaa/index.html

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Overlooking risks leads to breach, $400,000 settlement

On January 27, 2012, MCPN filed a breach report with OCR indicating that a hacker accessed employees' email accounts and obtained 3,200 individuals' ePHI through a phishing incident.

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      [ALERT] You Want To Fix This MS-Word 0-day Threat Today  Monday night, researchers at Proofpoint sounded the alarm about a critical 0-day threat known as CVE-2017-0199 in Microsoft Word that allowed booby-trapped Dridex phishing attacks be sent to millions of employees claiming to be a PDF sent to them by their company photocopier.  This one is particularly bad because it bypasses exploit mitigations built into Windows, doesn't require your employee to enable macros, works even against Windows 10 which is Redmond's most secure OS yet, and this exploit works on most or all Windows versions of Word. Ouch!  Campaign Uses Spoofed Email Domains  Dridex used to rely on macro-infected documents attached to emails and use social engineering to trick the user to open the attachment and click the macro button. This time around they were pretty nimble and leveraged a zero-day in Word. Proofpoint's technical analysis said:  "Emails in this campaign used an attached Microsoft Word RTF (Rich Text Format) document. Messages purported to be from "". [device] may be "copier", "documents", "noreply", "no-reply", or "scanner". The subject line in all cases read "Scan Data" and included attachments named "Scan_123456.doc" or "Scan_123456.pdf", where "123456" was replaced with random digits. Note that while this campaign does not rely on sophisticated social engineering, the spoofed email domains and common practice of emailing digitized versions of documents make the lures fairly convincing.   What To Do About It?   1) Patch. Fortunately, on Tuesday Microsoft released its regular batch of security patches - including a fix for this nasty Office zero-day vulnerability CVE-2017-0199. Turns out that this wasn't the only thing needed patching. An elevation of privilege vulnerability in Internet Explorer (CVE-2017-0210) that would allow an attacker to convince a user to visit a compromised website was also fixed.  2) If you cannot patch. Here is a quick and dirty fix to prevent this exploit from working by adding the following to your Windows registry: Software\Microsoft\Office\15.0\Word\Security\FileBlock\RtfFiles to 2 and OpenInProtectedView to 0.   3) Find out if your domain can be spoofed. Did you know that one of the first things hackers try is to see if they can spoof the email address of someone in your own domain? Now they can launch a spear phishing attack on your organization.  If you are a managed services customer we are already helping you. If not go here to see why managed services makes sense.  https://www.skyport-it.com/managed-services/   Safe Regards,  Dan

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[ALERT] You Want To Fix This MS-Word 0-day Threat Today

Monday night, researchers at Proofpoint sounded the alarm about a critical 0-day threat known as CVE-2017-0199 in Microsoft Word that allowed booby-trapped Dridex phishing attacks be sent to millions of employees claiming to be a PDF sent to them by their company photocopier.

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       Five-year prediction: cloud vs. data center   Analysts, tech bloggers and IT managers have been debating the net value of using data centers vs. the public cloud for years now. We’ve seen opinions around business advantages and disadvantages for both, but which will ultimately win the cost war in the future? We went straight to the front lines of IT for answers.  We sat down with Samuel Alt, technical support specialist at Ingram Micro, to get his future forecast. He has extensive, real-world experience with both data centers and the cloud, and his five-year prediction may surprise you.   Everyone's talking about the cloud overtaking data centers. What's your opinion?  The short-term play for many companies is cloud, due to low upfront costs and instant scalability, but I question its long-term sustainability due to cost. As for the landscape five years from now, I actually see a shift back to an energy-efficient, powerful, shrunken form of data centers.   What will hurt the cloud play in the future?  Cost will eventually kill cloud momentum. The cloud appears cost-effective at first, but gets expensive quickly as you scale. Some organizations must store thousands of terabytes—that’s going to be a pain point as the world consumes more data. Cloud bandwidth is expensive. Cloud SQL storage is expensive.  There’s also a lack of control and flexibility in the cloud. I like to see, touch, migrate and own my data. Depending on what you’re using it for, it may be difficult and time-consuming to pull down your data when you want it.  Also, there’s always a bit of paranoia when it comes to someone else hosting your data. You have no idea whether it’s physically residing in Texas, Ohio, China—it could be sitting anywhere.   Why do you think data centers will make a comeback in five years?  I’ll start with my mobile phone analogy—the early consumer wireless phones were huge bricks. Then, they trended toward slimmer models with small screens. Today, they’re massive again, in the form of phablets with big screens, because that’s what consumers wanted all along. Since companies have never stopped wanting control over their data, I think we’ll see a similar return to on-premise data centers, just in a superior, resurrected form.   What will data centers look like in the future?  Smaller, extremely energy-efficient and more powerful. Imagine what people love about the cloud, but in a controllable, on-premise environment. That’s the future of data centers. The ideal scenario is total control over your data, but at a significantly lower cost and without taking up much physical real estate.   What else needs to happen in order to see a shift back to data centers?  Power efficiency is critical. One component that measures this is power usage effectiveness (PUE), which calculates the ratio of total amount of energy used by a data center facility to the energy delivered to computing equipment.  Currently, powering up a data center is expensive, but it won’t always be. Energy-efficient data centers will produce dramatic savings when it comes to power, heating and cooling costs.   What's the tipping point?  The cost of hardware (cooling infrastructure, firewalls, tape drives, etc.) will decrease and the cost of using the cloud will increase. IT managers will balk at the annual cloud spend. Again, pricing will catch up to the cloud as we consume more data.  Going forward, I think that cloud will have a great place in the SMB and small data center market. However, any mid- to large-scale data center will not be willing to change due to a cost perspective.   Can you speak more to the physical size of future data centers?  Data centers will shrink with virtualization. The days of massive racks filled with networking equipment will go away. (Think old IBM mainframes that took up half a building.) Space is money. Real estate is a key reason why companies go to the cloud—with virtualization, that won’t be a factor. Consider how hyperconvergence integrates storage, networking and virtualization all in one box.  In five years, you could run an enterprise from a small closet. In 10 years, from your pocket.

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FIVE-YEAR PREDICTION: CLOUD VS. DATA CENTER

Analysts, tech bloggers and IT managers have been debating the net value of using data centers vs. the public cloud for years now. We’ve seen opinions around business advantages and disadvantages for both, but which will ultimately win the cost war in the future? We went straight to the front lines of IT for answers.

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      NOTABLE RECENT SECURITY ISSUES  Title: Cisco Releases Critical Security Advisory For IOS and IOS XE 0-day Found in "Vault 7" Info Dump Description: Cisco has released a critical security advisory in response to CVE-2017-3881, a 0-day vulnerability that was identified in the "Vault 7" information dump. CVE-2017-3881 is a remote code execution vulnerability that manifests in the Cisco Cluster Management Protocol (CMP) processing functionality of IOS and IOS XE. A remote, unauthenticated attacker who transmits malformed CMP-specific Telnet options to a vulnerable device could exploit this flaw and execute arbitrary code with elevated privileges. Note that the vulnerable device must be configured to accept Telnet connections. Cisco is currently developing software updates that will address this vulnerability. Reference:  https://tools.cisco.com/security/center/content/CiscoSecurityAdvisory/cisco-sa-20170317-cmp  Snort SID: 41909-41910

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Cisco Releases Critical Security Advisory For IOS and IOS XE 0-day Found in "Vault 7" Info Dump

Comment

      A Single Spear Phishing Click Caused the Yahoo Data Breach   A single click was all it took to launch one of the biggest data breaches ever.   One mistaken click. That's all it took for a Canadian hacker aligned with rogue Russian FSB spies to gain access to Yahoo's network and potentially the email messages and private information of as many as 1.5 billion people.  The U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation has been investigating the intrusion for two years, but it was only in late 2016 that the full scale of the hack became apparent. On Wednesday, the FBI indicted four people for the attack, two of whom are rogue FSB spies who work for the division that is supposed to cooperate with America’s FBI on cybercrime investigations. (The FSB is the successor of the KGB).   Kremlin Intelligence Services Overlap With Russian Cybercrime Underworld  One of these two rogues, Dmitry Dokuchaev, was himself recently arrested on what the Moscow press calls “treason” charges for passing information to the CIA. In reality, Dokuchaev started out as a criminal hacker who moved to the FSB but never stopped his old tricks. He was just one of the many criminals working inside Russia’s intelligence bureaucracy, and for personal profit he sold information to intermediaries that ultimately found its way to the CIA. The investigation exposed rivalries inside the Kremlin intelligence establishment as well as inside the Russian cybercrime underworld with which it overlaps. Dokuchaev was part of the Shaltai-Boltai, a hacker group that exploits stolen data to embarrass and blackmail Russian politicians and business officials.   Here's how the FBI says they did it:  The hack began with a spear phishing email sent in early 2014 to a Yahoo company employee. It's unclear how many employees were targeted and how many emails were sent, but it only takes one person to click on a link, and it happened.  Unimaginable that Yahoo did not sufficiently step employees through new-school security awareness training to prevent disasters like this.  It was all over the press, but CSO had the best story about, with more detail, background and even video:  http://www.csoonline.com/article/3180762/data-breach/inside-the-russian-hack-of-yahoo-how-they-did-it.html   Check out the new SkyPort IT service that can test and train your employees to do the right with these inbound threats ... go to https://www.skyport-it.com/phishing  Best Regards, Dan   PS - CHECK OUT OUR USEFUL INFO-STATION (CLICK HERE)

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A single click was all it took to launch one of the biggest data breaches ever.

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      Scam Of The Week: New FBI and IRS Alerts Against W-2 Phishing  There is a wave of W-2 phishing attacks going on. We see these coming in through thousands of reported scam attempts via our Phishing Alert Button. The FBI and the IRS have repeatedly posted warnings that these attacks have started early and that the volume has gone up significantly this year.  Remember those Nigerian prince emails? They are also called 'Nigerian 419' scams because the first wave of them came from Nigeria. The ' 419 ' part of the name comes from the section of Nigeria's Criminal Code which outlaws the practice. Well, those gangs have all "growed up" and they are now behind many of today's W-2 scams. It is surprisingly easy to do a little bit of research and send a spoofed email that looks like it is from the CEO.  These W-2 scams are hitting everywhere, even a Cyber Security Contractor was hit with one of these. On Thursday, March 16, the CEO of Defense Point Security, LLC — a Virginia company that bills itself as “the choice provider of cyber security services to the federal government” — told all employees that their W-2 tax data was handed directly to fraudsters after someone inside the company fell for a W-2 spear phishing attack. OUCH!   What To Do About It    I  strongly  suggest you send this to all employees, and mark it as  important  for all staff in HR, Legal and Accounting. You're welcome to copy/paste/edit:     "This year, authorities are warning about a massive wave of W-2 tax form phishing scams. Cyber criminals are sending "spoofed" emails that look like they come from the CEO or another C-level executive and ask for a PDF with the W-2 tax information of all employees. The W-2's have all the information needed to file fraudulent tax returns and steal anyone's identity.  Here are five steps to prevent an incredible amount of hassle and possible damage:   If you receive any email requesting any kind of W-2 tax information, pick up the phone and verify that request before you email anything to anybody.  File your taxes at the state and federal level as quickly as you can, or file for an October 16 extension early,  before  the bad guys can file a bogus claim.  Consider filing form 14039 and request an IP PIN from the government. Form 14039 requires you to state you believe you are likely to be a victim of identity fraud. Even if cyber criminals haven’t tried to file a bogus tax return in your name, virtually every American's data has been stolen which can lead to your identity being stolen.  Every 4 months, get a free once-a-year credit report from the three major credit bureaus. Get them on your calendar (cycle through them) and dispute any unauthorized activity.  Place a "security freeze" or "credit freeze" on your files with all three credit bureaus to prevent ID thieves from assuming your identity and open up a line of credit in your name.    This time of year, it is more important than ever to Think Before You Click!   Best Regards,  Dan

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Scam Of The Week: New FBI and IRS Alerts Against W-2 Phishing

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      Cures Act - How will it affect you?   As of December 1st, 2016, the Cures Act passed in the US House, and will likely pass with no issue to be signed into law by the President. The 996 page bill covers quite a few things - from FDA regulatory adjustments to increased funding to neurological studies - including changes in how companies in the Medical industry must interact.          

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


      The biggest change that will affect you may just be something completely unexpected - alterations necessary for handling of PHI. The new bill stipulates new requirements on the systems used to store PHI and other medical records, specifically, how that data is shared between your company's chosen PHI management system and all others. Services like One Medical Passport, AdvantX, and Amkai may need major software revisions to comply with the new law, and as a result - there’s likely to be increased strain on IT departments to facilitate these upgrades and training of your staff.       Further, the bill requires that patients are able to easily access their medical records - all in one place. We recommend you prepare an increased allotment for employee training, and perhaps a raise in the IT budget for subscriptions to new software licenses that will make this possible. EMR’s, being businesses themselves, won’t want to take responsibility for enforcing all of these new services, and will likely push it on to you whenever possible.       This isn’t all bad news, however.       The IT industry has long seen a need for this interoperability and security change, and patients (even yourself) are very likely to see a marked increase in their doctors’ and specialists’ efficiency to resolve problems based on historical data that they couldn’t easily access before.       The hard takeaways are these:         Expect a need to boost training budget.      Expect a need to boost IT budget.     It is more important than ever to have an IT team that not only keeps up to date on technology advances, but also changes in legal regulations and best practices for your industry. Make sure you are properly staffed.

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The biggest change... may just be something completely unexpected.

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      USB Infiltrators   Ah, humble USB - the connection as ubiquitous as pay-phones used to be.    They power our phones. They allow us to plug in everything from keyboards and mice to storage devices and printers. What would we do without them? It’s true, in our personal lives, these flexible ports are hard to live without. In the business world though, their flexibility is becoming a lucrative way to steal your data. This can happen several ways:       Hackers can ‘spread the net wide’, and infect your employees’ home computers with silent viruses that, in turn, infect any devices plugged into them. All that needs to happen next is for your unknowing employee (or yourself) to plug in the infected phone or flash drive to their work computer.        

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


      A malicious individual or employee with a bone to pick (maybe for getting passed over for that position or raise?) can plug in any number of ‘pwn devices’  (easily purchased hacking devices - that look just like flash drives!) to access data they shouldn’t, sell privileged information, or just knock out your network with Ransomware. Stuff like this    DOES    happen.       Fortunately, it is possible for those in corporate situations to have their IT team disable USB storage devices, stopping many of these attacks in their tracks. Since employees often have corporate email, Network Drives, or company-provided laptops - these USB devices are simply not a risk worth taking. Yes, it’s a slight hindrance. But isn’t it worth it?     While security almost always comes with an inconvenient side-effect, we must remain vigilant.     Security always trumps convenience when it comes to business.       Now that you know about this risk, we highly recommend speaking with your IT team about it. If you get pushback, or you would like a second opinion, don’t be afraid to reach out! We’re available and affordable for consulting, audits, and    much more   .             We write articles like these because we care about the state of corporate IT.     But writing isn't the only thing we do - our expertise comes from being in the industry since 1986.    We are an MSP, and we offer a wealth of services - from managing your corporate IT, to preparing your network to pass PCI-DSS or HIPAA compliance. If that sounds like something you need,  click here to learn more , or reach out to us right now  by clicking here . 

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They allow us to plug in everything...and their flexibility is becoming a lucrative way to steal your data?

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       WHY WON'T THINGS PRINT CORRECTLY? Here's the Fix       
   
     “ Text was illegible. Links to policy changes became useless. ” 
   
  
 
           In early 2015, Google made the decision to phase out an older piece of technology that a lot of people still used in their Chrome browser.       Shortly after that announcement, Mozilla stated they would soon do the same for their ever-popular Firefox browser. Microsoft went even further - to never offer this technology in the latest incarnation of their browsing efforts - Microsoft Edge.         So what is this technology, and why did all these industry heavy-hitters decide to remove it? More importantly, what does this have to do with   printing?     
  
  
 
 
 
 
 
  
  
  
  
  
   
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          This one is a lot more easy to understand than you might think. They decided to remove the old technology (  called the NPAPI framework  ) that allows certain ‘enhancements’ to run on your web browsing experience because it slowed your browsing down - and made it significantly less secure.         Now onto printing. One of the manufacturers making use of this NPAPI technology to enhance your browsing was Adobe. That’s right - another industry behemoth. What Adobe used to do was include a built-in Adobe Reader for your web browser (Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer) so that if you clicked on an Adobe file (like the ubiquitous PDF) on a website, it would open the file immediately, right within your browser window.     Convenient, right? Well, yes and no.       As it turns out, convenience and security often don’t go hand-in-hand, and it was a somewhat poor idea to implement it the way they did  -   with NPAPI  .      

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


       Mozilla, Google, and Microsoft quickly realized many people would be left unable to easily open these Adobe files - so they individually cobbled-together their own ‘Adobe Reader plugin knockoffs’ to include with their respective browsers.            While these work admirably well most of the time, they seem to lack the consistency that the Adobe version did -   Especially   when it came to printing.    If printing PDF’s is important to you (as many nurses, doctors, and schedulers have found it to be) this can be a HUGE problem. After recent updates to Firefox and Chrome, two of our clients in the medical industry had enormous issues printing PDF’s. Sizing was wrong. Important data - cut off at the bottom of the page. Text was illegible.          Links to policy changes became useless.                 
   
     “ That not so simple part would be applying that fix for every user, of every browser, on every computer in your company. ” 
   
  
 
      The Fix     We swooped in and found a fix to get them back up and running, STAT. Effectively, the fix is to change a few settings in your preferred browser to choose an updated version of Adobe automatically before printing. And it works great! That’s the simple part.     If this is an issue with your computer, here’s a link to a how-to for Chrome and Firefox:      http://goo.gl/Rnfayb    (case sensitive)     That not so simple part would be applying that fix for every user, of every browser, on   every computer in your company.   But in our scenario, we found a way to push out the necessary changes to all of them,  at the same time.       If you’re running into this on multiple machines, our talented engineers can get your business back to optimal efficiency. Give us a call.     Until next month,    Robbie Pence, Editor                We write articles like these because we care about the state of corporate IT.     But writing isn't the only thing we do - our expertise comes from being in the industry since 1986.    We are an MSP, and we offer a wealth of services - from managing your corporate IT, to preparing your network to pass PCI-DSS or HIPAA compliance. If that sounds like something you need,  click here to learn more , or reach out to us right now  by clicking here . 

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Printers cutting off important bits of your PDF? We can fix that.

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